Adam Gethin

Adam Gethin

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Design exercise, 2018

LGBT Guyana

LGBT Guyana logo

Summary

LGBTQ people and issues are deeply stigmatised in Guyana; not only does the country have laws against “gross indecency” between two males, a 2015 report from SASOD has pointed out several issues with how LGBTQ people are treated within Guyana.

LGBTI people [feel] isolated from the rest of society and feeling like second-class citizens, leading to mental health issues including depression and oftentimes suicide.

Stakeholder Report to the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on the Protection of the Rights of LGBTI Persons in Guyana, SASOD (August 2015)

There are many causes for this, as detailed in the report. However, one highlighted by SASOD is that Guyana has “failed to provide sexuality education that is comprehensive and inclusive of different sexualities and gender identities,” which, amongst other things, means that Guyana is not meeting its obligations under Article 13 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, of which Guyana has been a ratified signatory since 1977.

This design exercise’s main goal is to provide education which is LGBTQ-inclusive and accessible for everybody in Guyana, filling a gap which is neglected by the Guyanese government and Guyana’s education system.

Solution

Iterations of the logo displayed next to the final logo
Iterations of the logo displayed next to the final logo

The logo for the organisation is based on Guyana’s flag, which features a red triangle inside of a longer yellow triangle on a green field. The logo takes these arrows, sans fimbriations, and incorporates them into the most widely known LGBT symbol, the rainbow flag.

Other ideas involved adding coloured fimbriations to the flag to represent the rest of the colours in the rainbow flag. However, these solutions were not as elegant and recognisable as the final design.

More images of the logo, including the logo on a white, black, and colour block background
More images of the logo, including the logo on a white, black, and colour block background
Logo with trans, bi, and pan flag variants
Logo with trans, bi, and pan flag variants

The logo was also modified to represent other LGBT flags, namely the trans, bi, and pan flags. The abstract flag symbol remains at the left, and the modifications to the logo don’t harm its recognisability whilst furthering its flexibility.

Posters
Posters

The branding uses Halyard, a versatile grotesque sans which comes in eight weights, two optical sizes, and comes with many stylistic alternatives. Halyard delivers the message in an authoritative yet neutral manner and is remarkably readable, which is helpful.

A leaflet
A leaflet

Leaflets are set using the legible Halyard Text face in a friendly tone which uses simple language in order to explain these issues which people may find complex to understand at first; Guyana has a relatively low functional literacy rate.1 Making these materials accessible and friendly is important in order to help people who want to learn more about LGBTQ issues, either as somebody who is queer or trans, or somebody who is an ally educating themselves on LGBT issues without potentially encountering misleading or malicious advice or information.

  1. The only paper regarding Guyana's functional literacy rate is a fairly dated paper by Zellynne Jennings–Craig of the University of the West Indies, who estimated that only approximately 11% of young people showed a high level of functional literacy. However, the majority of people surveyed, or 72.5%, have a moderate or above level of functional literacy.  ↩